Articles Posted in Stress and Divorce

ANGRY EMAILS? … HOSTILE TEXTS? … NASTY LETTERS?  

Consider the BIFF RESPONSE® METHOD

Have you been the recipient of angry tests, nasty emails, and ugly outbursts in public?   Has your ex said nasty things about you on a social media site?   Has the parent of your child said bad things about you?  Have the things said made you angry, embarrassed, humiliated, or infuriated?   Have you reacted and then perhaps regretted your reaction.  Have you found yourself in a hearing with the threat that nasty texts between you and your partner were going to be presented to a judge?      In our family law practice we come across all kinds of situations and people.  The cases that present the most conflict, however,  often involve one party who seems to thrive on hostilities.   Our philosophy is to minimize conflict.    Our goal is to reduce the anger and angst of family matters,  so when a case presents with communication difficulties between the parties—especially  unkind, nasty,  accusatory messages–  we seek out ways to help clients learn skills to deal with  the high conflict people who  engage them and the attendant situations.  Thus, we are sharing the BIFF  Response Method of Conflict Resolution here.

One of the more common questions a client asks when consulting a divorce attorney is “how much will this cost?”  There is no easy answer to this question, as it depends on any number of factors- is the spouse in a fighting mood? Is their attorney not prone to encouraging settlement? Are there complex assets at stake that take time and money to understand?

A lengthy and protracted divorce can cost thousands, and even individuals receiving monetary support from the spouse they are divorcing can run up against mounting bills. If the parties establish separate residences, suddenly both are attempting to sustain a household with only their income, where once they had a partner. This all coincides with a monthly expense few people account for in their personal budgets- attorney’s fees.

These booming expenses may result in parties getting creative about their finances.  Some choose to try and cut down on living expenses, some charge it on a credit card and hope for a favorable payout at the end of the road, and some dip into their retirement just to get by.

Should I Use Retirement Funds?

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Until recently if one party to a marriage would not consent to a divorce in Pennsylvania  there was a mandatory  two year waiting period before the moving party could proceed with a divorce.   On October 4, 2016, Governor Wolf signed House Bill 380, which reduces the waiting period from two years to one.   The new law goes into effect this December 2016.

This law is a major victory for parents and children in Pennsylvania.     Divorce, as we have written here previously, is one of the most stressful times in the life of a family.   It  can be a time of  uncertainty,  anxiety, anger,  fear and depression.   Children may be confused and scared.   A prolonged  waiting period  between unhappy parents  can have serious detrimental effects upon spouses and the children who  may bear witness to fighting and experience instability.

The original legislative intent behind a  waiting period was for family reunification.   Our lawmakers felt that  a longer waiting period would encourage reconciliation.  They  respected keeping families together,  and did not want to be quick to endorse family break up.  In reality, their intention was not realized.

By the time one party makes the heart wrenching decision to consult an attorney and proceed with a divorce filing, the likelihood of a family reunification is almost nil.   Continue reading

Alcohol and/or other substance abuse is a known factor in many domestic relations cases. If one party drinks to excess, or uses drugs it can have an significant impact on the marital relationship and on the children. Tensions build, it can lead to secrecy, alienation, breakdown in communication; there may be episodes of violence, the substance abuse may lead to economic problems if it impacts ability to work or sustain a job, and it causes numerous other problems. Oftentimes, the effects of substance abuse on a relationship take years to manifest because one or both parties may be in denial.

A happy, successful, outwardly stable family can become unstable through the pain of alcoholism. Regardless of what triggers the alcoholism, if this is a factor in your family dynamic, it is important to acknowledge it.

The Pennsylvania Courts take substance abuse very seriously. Because the best interests of the children are primary, Courts carefully will consider evidence of substance abuse in any custody determination. If there is any concern that the health or welfare of a child is endangered by being in the custody a parent who is an alcoholic or substance abuser, primary physical custody could be granted to the other parent , and the substance using parent might be denied physical custody or granted limited supervised partial custody.