Articles Posted in Stress and Divorce

Until recently if one party to a marriage would not consent to a divorce in Pennsylvania  there was a mandatory  two year waiting period before the moving party could proceed with a divorce.   On October 4, 2016, Governor Wolf signed House Bill 380, which reduces the waiting period from two years to one.   The new law goes into effect this December 2016.

This law is a major victory for parents and children in Pennsylvania.     Divorce, as we have written here previously, is one of the most stressful times in the life of a family.   It  can be a time of  uncertainty,  anxiety, anger,  fear and depression.   Children may be confused and scared.   A prolonged  waiting period  between unhappy parents  can have serious detrimental effects upon spouses and the children who  may bear witness to fighting and experience instability.

The original legislative intent behind a  waiting period was for family reunification.   Our lawmakers felt that  a longer waiting period would encourage reconciliation.  They  respected keeping families together,  and did not want to be quick to endorse family break up.  In reality, their intention was not realized.

By the time one party makes the heart wrenching decision to consult an attorney and proceed with a divorce filing, the likelihood of a family reunification is almost nil.   Continue reading

Alcohol and/or other substance abuse is a known factor in many domestic relations cases. If one party drinks to excess, or uses drugs it can have an significant impact on the marital relationship and on the children. Tensions build, it can lead to secrecy, alienation, breakdown in communication; there may be episodes of violence, the substance abuse may lead to economic problems if it impacts ability to work or sustain a job, and it causes numerous other problems. Oftentimes, the effects of substance abuse on a relationship take years to manifest because one or both parties may be in denial.

A happy, successful, outwardly stable family can become unstable through the pain of alcoholism. Regardless of what triggers the alcoholism, if this is a factor in your family dynamic, it is important to acknowledge it.

The Pennsylvania Courts take substance abuse very seriously. Because the best interests of the children are primary, Courts carefully will consider evidence of substance abuse in any custody determination. If there is any concern that the health or welfare of a child is endangered by being in the custody a parent who is an alcoholic or substance abuser, primary physical custody could be granted to the other parent , and the substance using parent might be denied physical custody or granted limited supervised partial custody.